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Full text of "The dial"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/dial1985fram 



gRp 



ftemJngham State CoJteQB 




THE DIAL 

1385 
Volume 67 

Framingkam State College 



Dial Staff 



Editor-in-Chief: Lisa DuFries 
Assistant Editor: Lisa Martin 
Photography Editor: Greg Valentini 
Sports Editor: Lee McElroy 
Copy Editor: Sue McNulty 

Staff: Jamie Batcheldor 
Deborah Mahan 
Lynn Hovland 
Ilene Bloom 
Erick Lahme 

Photographers: John McCracken 
Mike Tonelli 
Kelly Welby 
Jeff Spence 
Paul Murphy 

Special thanks to the Gatepost Staff for contributing articles. 



LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 



If one word could describe this 1984-1985 year, I 
would choose the word "CHANGE". Change brings 
the end of one thing and begins something else. With- 
in our college community as well as in the world 
around us we have certainly seen a lot of changes . . . 

CHANGE: the retirement of President D. Justin 

McCarthy 
CHANGE: the assassination of India's Prime Minis- 
ter, Indira Ghandi 
CHANGE: the new addition of the clock on the 

College Center building 
CHANGE: the death of Soviet leader Andropov 
CHANGE: the new non-alcohol policy on campus 
CHANGE: the first nomination of a woman for the 

office of Vice-President of the United States. 
CHANGE: the "coup d'etat" of our food service 
CHANGE: the efforts of many people to bring an end 

to world hunger 
CHANGE: the closing and re-opening of the Ram's 

Den Pub 
CHANGE: the controversial heart transplants of 

man and animal 
CHANGE: the graduation of the Class of 1985 

For many of us it has been this last change that has 
been our primary concern for the last nine months — 
GRADUATION! An end to a long list of obligations 
and a beginning of new requirements in our careers. 
The end of reading about the world, the beginning of 
becoming a part of it. The end of late night cram 
sessions, parties, and fire-drills — the beginning of 
early morning rush hours. 

We've prepared at Framingham State College 
together and now we go our separate ways. This isn't 
the only time for change in our lives, but it will be one 
of our biggest. GOOD LUCK! 

Lisa DuFries 
Editor, 1985 DIAL 




One thing that hasn't 
changed is the crowds of col- 
lege students that flock to 
southern waters during 
spring break. This year a 
group of F.S.C. students in- 
vaded the Bahamas for the 
"INTERVARSITY TAN- 
NING CLUB FINALS" 
(see page 33). 




d. justin McCarthy 



"TIME'S MAN OF 
THE YEAR'' 



Dr. D. Justin McCarthy, president of 
Framingham State College for the past 23 
years, will retire in August, 1985. Dr. 
McCarthy, an honors graduate of 
Bridgewater State College, earned his 
doctorate at Harvard University where 
he was elected to PHI DELTA KAPPA 
honorary professional society. He be- 
came president of Framingham State Col- 
lege in 1961. 

The nation's first public institution for 
preparing teachers, Framingham State 
has grown during Dr. McCarthy's pres- 
idency from a college of 700 students with 
two majors, in elementary education and 
home economics, to a comprehensive 
state college offering 27 undergraduate 
majors and 12 master's level programs. 

Now serving over 9,000 students, the 
college has 3,125 undergraduates and 
over 6,000 graduate and continuing 
education students. 

The president's administration has 
seen the college fulfill a multi-million- 
dollar facility expansion program which 
includes academic buildings, dormitor- 
ies, faculty and administrative offices, 
and ecumenical chapel, library, athletic 
fields, and spacious college center used 
widely by both the college and outside 
groups. 

Asked about his feelings regarding the 
rapid growth of the college. Dr. McCar- 
thy expressed his gratitude in being able 
to contribute toward the academic and 
physical development of Framingham 
State through the participation of many 
people. 




The class of 1985 leaves it's mark on the wall by honoring President McCarthy and 
donating the money to buy the letters to dedicate the building to our retiring president. 




President McCarthy and his wife joined the festivities during Home Coming Week. 
Shown here at the Alumni Ball, the McCarthy's were found frequently attending 
college-related functions. 



(Continued from the preceeding page) 

Among the many honors awarded Pres- 
ident McCarthy, Bridgewater State Col- 
lege presented him the "Nicholas Till- 
inghast Distinguished Service Award" in 
1981. The award is the highest honor 
given to a Bridgewater alumnus. In 1980 
he was named Associate in Education at 
Harvard Graduate School of education. 

Known in higher education circles for 
his experience in accreditation of colleges 
and universities, President McCarthy has 
served on over 20 accreditation teams in 
various parts of the country, the majority 
of them as chairman. He was named as a 
member of the National Commission on 
Accreditation and an evaluator of pres- 
idential performance. 

Dr. McCarthy was honored by Marist 
College as "Lightbearer of the Year" in 
1972. He was also given a special award 
by the Affirmative Action Officers in 
Massachusetts Public Higher Education 
in 1979 at a meeting held on campus. In 
addition, he was honored by Cushing 
Hospital in 1983, the South Middlesex 
Area Chamber of Commerce in 1981, and 
the Center for the Performing Arts in 
1984. 

President McCarthy has accomplished 
a lot during his 23 years at Framingham 
State College and we wish him well in all 
of his future endeavors. 




In 1979, poet David McCord, renowned Grand Bostonian and Harvard 
alumnus, wrote that of over 40 college presidents he has known — 

"(But) not a one that I'd more gladly fit 

Into a verse wherein my aim would be 

To box the compass by which one could steer 

Toward landfall after landfall in your life — 

A life you daily give to your career." 




WHAT IS 
SUAE? 



By Wendy Aldred 

"Making the most of your col- 
lege years," is what Deanna Gor- 
don, president of the Student Un- 
ion Activities Board (S.U.A.B.), 
hopes every student at FSC will 
do. This could mean getting in- 
volved in S.U.A.B., one of the 
most active clubs on campus, or 
burrowing yourself in academic 
studies, or some combination of 
the two! 

The Student Union Activities 
Board is a student organization 
that plans social, educational, and 
recreational activities. Together 
all five officers, nine committee 
chairpersons, 14 executive board 
members, and the general board 
work hard planning events 
throughout the year, which cover 
all areas of social activities helping 
to make college life both a fun and 
learning experience. 

Some of the events S.U.A.B. 
features are the Coffeehouse 
events, FSC Perspectives, Sand- 
box Weekend, Homecoming, 
Beach Weekend, movies, dances, 
lectures and trips. 

The only requirements to be- 
come a member are "the enthu- 
siasm and the willingness to par- 
ticipate," says President Gordon. 




SANDBOX 18 




The band "NITROUS" brought Sandbox 18 to a 
rocking close. Here Jeff Chaulk, bass guitarist, 
"plays" to the crowd. 





SANDBOX is a bi-annual event sponsored through the Student Union Activities Board representing the entire campus. Each 
Fall and Spring it features campus talent performed on the upper sandbox of the D. Justin McCarthy College Center. 
Spectators relax on the lawn and enjoy the concerts. As one of the largest events held at Framingham State College, 
SANDBOX is a memorable occasion enjoyed by all. 




FSC HOMECOMING 1984-1985 




The theme for the Homecoming Weekend of 1984-1985 was "A CLASS AFFAIR". Pictured above are Lisa 
DuFries, Liz Gomez, and Brenda Doherty. 







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Homecoming Weekend consisted of a 
variety of events including the dorm de- 
corating contest won by Horace Mann 
Hall, competitions between dorms and 
clubs in the Ram-Olympics won by Peirce 
Hall, Comedy Night, the FACE TO 
FACE Concert, the Semi-Formal Home- 
coming Dance, and of course the Football 
game. We played Massachusetts Meri- 
time Academy, and despite our strong 
support we were ultimately defeated. 

The Homecoming King and Queen for 
this year were Kevin Malloy and Jodie 
Rafus. Among the contestants were (from 
left to right) Rich Caruso, Kathy Young, 
Russ Stone, Julia Connors, and Maria 
Kelly. 




11 



A CLASS AFFAIR" 





12 








13 




According to Janis Reed, music consultant for Boston's fore- 
most rock n' roll magazine The Beat, WDJM is the station to 
tune to in Massachusetts. In a recent article entitled "The Best 
of 1984", Reed states, "In true spirit of college radio, WDJM in 
Framingham does not behave in the 'clique-ish" manner of 
certain other "we rule" college and major radio people. Hope- 
fully, its innovative programming and spirit will not end up 
ignored." 

The WDJM staff was pleased by the article, which appeared 
in the January issue of The Beat, written by such a respected 
critic. WDJM's General Manager Robb Timm explains, "It 
wasn't as if we were rated 'the Best College Station' but we 
were rated "The best Radio Station" — period. Our reputation 
is spotless and highly regarded. In fact, Framingham's new 
video channel V66 called us looking for interns because 'DJM 
people have proven themselves to be top notch in the broadcast- 
ing field. Of course, we are not for everybody — just for people 
tired of listening to the same ten records. 

How has such a transformation come about? Many factors 
have played a part in WDJM's radio prominence. The first move 
was the boost in power from ten to one-hundred watts a year 
ago. One DJ noted, "Until recently we were lucky to get three 
phone calls a show, but now it has become nearly impossible to 
play so many requests during a two-hour show." 




WDJM Disc Jockeys should be proud of the new atten- 
tion and popularity that the station has received this year. 
With change comes growth and WDJM is certainly doing 
that! 




14 




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Above left, some of WDJM's staff flaunt the new WDJM bumper-stickers. From left to right are; Who 
R.U., Beth Lennon, Dan Kelty, Ivan Slovan, Mike Leonard, and Greg Valentini. Since the station went 
100 watts this year WDJM found the need to let people outside of our college community know about 
F.S.C.'s great station and the bumper-stickers did the trick. Above right, Kim O'Neil and Rob Hamilton 
cuddle-up for our camera but who knows what goes on in the studio that we can't see?! 




15 




On Tuesday, September 11, the Stu- 
dent Government Association held its 
first session with its new president, Cindy 
Santomassimo, at the wheel. And by the 
sound of things, the road could be very 
promising. 

As senator Carol Besgen commented, 
"I'm very excited." And she has good 
reason to be. Last year's election has not 
only put a different face at the head of 
S.G.A., but also a host of new ideas and 
very positive ideas at that. 

Cindy Santomassimo explained that 
plans are in the making to better organize 
S.G.A. Executive meetings will now be 
held after the senate meeting in order to 
stop delays that were caused by late run- 
ning executive meetings last year. Also 
the executive meeting will discuss that 
following week's business. Then those 
issues will be posted to give senators one 
week to decide what opinions they may 
have. 




Here are the hard working individuals who keep S.G.A. going. From 
left to right are TOP ROW: Karen St. Pierre, Lee McElroy, and Steve 
Hampe. BOTTOM ROW: Martha McCagg, Cindy Santomassimo and 
Sue McNulty. 




16 



With "change" comes new 

people, new ideas and new 

energy. That's exactly what 

Cindy Santomassimmo brought 

to her position as the head of 

S.G.A. Never be afraid of 

change ! 




17 




THE 



GAT 




FIRST SEMESTER 


THE GATEPOST STAFF 


- EDITOR - 


— STAFF — 


Paul Fitzgerald 


Patty Lowther, Liz Russo 


- FEATURE EDITOR - 


— ART & GRAPHIC STAFF — 


Wendy Aldred 


John Fields, Dara Hennessy 


— PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR — 


Sarah Shiel, Beth Smith 


Phil Reilly 


Cara Wentworth 


- SPORTS EDITOR — 


— PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF — 


Mimi Thibault 


Susan Aylain, Jeff DePaolo 


— SUAB EDITOR — 

Marilou Carey 


Elizabeth Krueger, Steven Reitter 
Nancy Silvestre, Mark Waters 


— BUSINESS MANAGERS — 

Kevin MacPherson 


— SPORTS STAFF — 

Bob Oliviera, Rich Leonard 


Kathryn Naujalis 




ASSISTANT-TO-THE-EDITOR 




Deborah A. Hipson 




— ART/ENTERTAINMENT — 




Glenn Matto, Susan Sullivan 




— REPORTERS — 




Susan Aylaian, Jay Bazzinotti 




Mary Beaudoin, Laurie Canavan 


Typeset by 


Sal Cesario, Marie Hett 


Framingham State College 


Dan MacLean, Terri Millette 


Media Communications Department 


Sherry Wave, Kathy Young 


Printed by Weston Graphics, Inc. 



SECOND SEMESTER 


The Gatepost Staff 


EDITOR 


Bill LaCroix 


COPY EDITOR 


Patty Lowther 


GRAPHICS EDITOR 


Cindy St. Cyr 


PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 


Phil Reilly 


NEWS EDITOR 


Sue McNulty 


MANAGING EDITORS 


Kevin MacPherson, Kathryn Naujalis 


SPORTS EDITOR 


Bob Oliviera 


ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT EDITORS 


Glenn Matto, Susan Sullivan 


REPORTERS: 


COPY STAFF: 


Jay Bazzinotti, Dan 


Liz Russo, L.ori Blinkhom 


MacLean, Janice 


ADVERTISING: 


Tibbetts 


Anne Mahoney 




STAFF ASSISTANTS: 


PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF: 


Lisa Gwiazda, Sheila 


i Sue Aylayian, Marc 


McDonough 


Wexler, Nancy Silvestre, 


ARTS AND GRAPHICS STAFF: 


Sherry Ware, Mark Keup 


John Thomquist 



18 




The DIAL Staff would like to thank the 
GATEPOST staff for their contributing articles and 
photographs. As Framingham State College's week- 
ly newspaper, the GATEPOST consistently 
produces quality work and we all can appreciate their 
commitment and talent. We commend the 
GATEPOST Staff in it's unbiased reporting and 
revelation of campus events, which must be hard to 
do sometimes when students are reporting on fellow 
students. If it wasn't for the GATEPOST alot of us 



would never know about campus related events and 
even national and world news. 

We'd especially like to congratulate the 
GATEPOST on their smooth transition of 
"editorship" when First Semester Editor, Paul 
Fitzgeral left to go to study abroad at which time Bill 
LaCroix accepted responsibility as Editor during 
Second Semester. Congratulations to the entire 
GATEPOST Staff for a job well done! 



19 





In these rare, "behind the scenes," 
photographs we find Paul Fitzgerald (top) 
— GATEPOST Editor first semester, and 
Phil Reilly (below) — GATEPOST Photo 
Editor. These two men are usually found 
behind the print instead of being the 
subject of it. They get the job done every 
week and make sure that we all know 
what's going on at F.S.C. 



20 



GATEWSTR)£LOU)-tlp: 

TAB RBCStir A^TlOB OW CAMPUS M0MUK6NTT3 HAS 

set off a uvwe cFTBuftsrAcrwtrv— 




^ftoflptsr 



As Framingham State's number one publication, the 
GATEPOST gives factual, up-to-date and often humorous 
accounts of F.S.C.'s sports, activities, and news and 
4 'landmarks." 



21 



SOCIOLOGISTS MAKE 
FETTER ROLE MODELS 




For the past two years, the Active Sociologists have been creating awareness of social issues 
of the times through various programs as well as prompting social and career networking for 
sociology majors. The organization has established an early morning lecture series entitles 
"Breakfast with Sociologists" to encourage informal discussions with area sociologists on 
topics deemed interesting to students faculty and other members of the college community. 
There were three such "get-togethers" during the 1984-85 year. 



22 



"GEOGRAPHY IS BASK. WITUOUT IT, 
UISTORV AND CIVICS ARE DRAMAS IN 
TUE AIR— PLAYS WITUOUT A STAGE. 
LITERATURE LACKS ADEQUATE SET- 
TING WITHOUT GEOGRAPHY. READING, 
WRITING, AMD CIPUERINSG ARE ftUT 
TOOLS OC THE MIND. EDUCATION 
BEGINS WITH GEOGRAPUY." 

-J.RUSSELL SMITH 




The Geographical Association is a club designed to further the study, 
discussion, and interest in Geography and its related fields. Member- 
ship is open to all Geography majors and other students who are inter- 
ested in Geography and are willing to actively participate in the affairs of 
the club. In the past, the Geographical Association has sponsored an 
all-campus forum on hazardous waste problems in the area. 



23 



HOME ECONOMICS 



The Louisa A. Nicholass Home 
Economics Club is F.S.C.'s only 
professional organization related 
to home economics. The club in- 
forms students of activities 
sponsored by both the 
Massachusetts and American 
Home Economics Associations. 
This year's programs of the club 
included professional develop- 
ment, community service 
projects, fundraising projects and 
social activities. Events for this 
year included — Craft Fair, Sock 
Hop, Spring Banquet, Nutrition 
Week activities, Fashion Show, 
Valentines Event and guest 
speakers. The club is open to 
Home Economics majors and also 
others interested in home econo- 




24 



THIRD WORLD 




The Third World Organizations 
helps to familiarize and unite the 
minority students who are a signif- 
icant part of the F.S.C. commu- 
nity. In hopes of achieving this, 
they sponsor guest speakers like 
Newscaster Liz Walker of NBC 
and this year's speaker Tanya 
Hart from WBZ-TV's COMING 
TOGETHER. They also sponsor 
RAM JAM in which surrounding 
state schools participated. A new 
organization on campus and a very 
important active one. 



Tanya Hart spoke at Framingham State College during BLACK AWARENESS WEEK. 




RAM JAM '85 



25 




The ONYX is the literary and visual magazine at 
Framingham State. It is printed once at the end of the 
school year and copies are made available free to 
students. The staff consists of students interested in 
reviewing submitted written and art work and choos- 
ing the material for this year's issue. As Laurie 
Canavan, Co-Editor-in-Chief puts it: The Onyx has 
always represented the "sense" of the students. This 
is so vital for unlike other Framingham State publica- 
tions, talking about students, the Onyx is the 
students, talking about. This is the trueness, the real 
relationship between students and the college. 

The Onyx reveals the births we all undergo in be- 
coming individuals. With each photograph, poem, or 
pen and ink, we expand our capacity for association. 
We see more. The tree is not just a tree.' 




26 



Here are a few excerpts from the 
1985 ONYX . . . 

Sugary images of a wintery day 

A day when death cast its bluish tinge over all living things 

Long pointed spears of frozen water hung from the tool shack in my yard 

and mounds of white crystals with the airiness of fair weather clouds 

Sprayed across the city to the rhythmical beat of the wind 

Making the day bitter cold 

I journeyed out into the whirling crystals catching them on my tongue 

An addiction I have on days such as these 

Freezing cold crystals numbing my teeth 

— Dana Smith 




27 



INNOCENCE — Brenda Boudreau 

Sometimes I feel like a pawn on a chessboard 

Small and expendable. 

Lost and won easily. 

I get tired of the games sometimes. 

Painted smiles and vacent eyes and 

Illusion of perfection as we try to mainipulate each 

other. 
Trying to mould clay 
That has almost hardened in the sun. 
Wind up dolls walkin aimlessly 
Toward each other. 
Look into my eyes and tell me what you see 

there. 
The intensity of my emotions 
Must be reflected someplace, 
but visibility is vulnerability — 
Even to myself 




A GOOD PARTY 

I woke up Sunday morning and it was Monday afternoon. 

— Ed Gannon 



28 




Since the Student Union Activi- 
ties Board does more than just 
sponsor SANDBOX, we thought 
that the people responsible for all 
our good times should get some 
additional credit. SUAB is one of 
the most active groups on campus, 
sponsoring coffee houses every 
Tuesday night in the College 
Center, films twice a week in 
Dwight Auditorium, dances, con- 
certs, and you name it — they 
sponsor it! 








29 



Other little known but popular "clubs" at F.S.C. 




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The "Disappearing Hand" Club. 



The "We sell no wine before it's time" Club. 








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The "I'm not up to anything" Club. 



The "You deserve a break today" Club 



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The "Paint your wagon" Club 



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The "Jane Fonda Workout" Club. 



The "Ballroom Dancing" Club. 



31 



Other little known but popular " clubs" at F.S.C. 




The Someday I'll be a Star-Club" 



'The only way to get to class 'club'." 



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The "I went to college to find a husband" club. 



The "Hang out on the wall" club. 
— One of our most popular clubs. 



32 




'The Inter- Varsity Tanning Club" 




'The Student Shoplifters Union. 



F.S.C.'s Cool-man club/' 



33 




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Framingham State College: it's not just a school, it's an adventure 







35 



Welcome to 1985 

by Jay Bazzinotti 

Welcome, children, welcome to 1985. It sure is a rude 
awakening to find that that nice old man in the White House who 
we college types voted overwhelmingly for is now cutting down 
one of our best avenues for pursuing a college education. Bye- 
bye, student loans! So long, education grants! You were, oh, so 
nice while we had you! Guess now I'll have to sell my stereo to 
stay in school. But that's okay. I really prefer knowing our taxes 
are going for something really worthwhile, like atom bombs or 
600 dollar toilet seats for military aircraft. So it doesn't bother 
me. Hey, I know a place in Boston where I can sell some of my 
blood if I really need the cash. And if I have to drop out of 
school, well, that's okay too. At least I have the knowledge that 
what might have been my college loan is now being used to close 
that window of vulnerabillity so we can keep those pesky 
Ruskies. 

Or maybe that 2500 bucks I would have squandered on an 
education is being used to cut the deficit. Hell, it's at 1 .8 trillion 
now, so I guess every little bit helps. You know, I could always 
enter the Service. I read a report in the paper saying that El 
Salvador is becoming more and more like Viet Nam, so I'm sure 
they'll need people to fight there soon. I've always wanted to 
ride on a helicopter. I wonder what combat is like. I'll bet there 
are some guys in the VA Hospital who can tell me. Who needs 
an education, anyway? If I survive the Service, I could get a 
pension that's six times what I might get with my college educa- 
tion. Gotta think about the future, you know. Besides, with So- 
cial Security on the same shakey grounds as my loans, maybe 
I'd better not plan to depend on it. 

Actually, I feel really good that our leaders are finally doing 
something about the budget deficit. The fact that it took 200 
years to get to 1 trillion, but only four additional years to almost 
double that sorta had me concerned. 

I guess it's going to be harder to stay in school now. I'll have 
to tighten my belt somewhat. No more car. It never ran well in 
the rain, anyway. No more luxuries. I'm going to have to give up 
that trip to Florida. But that's okay, really. Mr. Bennett, the 
Secretary of Education said that all this was necessary. And 
after all, he ought to know. He's got a college education. 





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36 






Change ! 

She was so tiny, so vulnerable. 
Her life was so brief. Yet Baby Fae 
made a impact on the conscious- 
ness of the world that seems likely 
to endure. Doomed from birth by 
her own malformed heart, at 2 
weeks she was given a baboon's 
heart that kept her alive for 
another 20 days, longer than any 
other human recipient of a heart 
transplant from another species. 

There were — and are — those 
who question the year's most con- 
troversial surgical operation on 
both medical and ethical grounds. 
The debate will continue. Still, no 
one who saw pictures of Baby Fae 
yawning sleepily or listening to her 
mom's voice over a telephone was 
unaffected. As Ann Martin, an 
anchorwoman at KABC-TV in 
Los Angeles put it, it was as if "the 
world keyed in on this one little 
person as a symbol of hope. We 
were pulling for her because she 
represented humanity." 





1985 was the first year that 
Framingham State College had a 
break in March, consistent with 
the spring break of other colleges 
and universities around the nation. 
Here two F.S.C. contestants in the 
"INTERVARSITY TANNING 
CLUB" enjoyed their break in the 
Bahamas. "Ooooo, Bahamas!" 



37 




38 






39 



CHANGE ! 



It is the belief of the Class of 1985 that present PFM practices 
are wholly non-beneficial to the mutual interests of our college 
community. More specificially, those vested interested of our 
constituents, the students. 

The Class has experienced this PFM negativism in our ex- 
tensive contracting of their services. For the past two academic 
years the Class has been forced to utilize only PFM for our 
catering needs. This is due to the contractual obligation the 
school has with PFM concerning catering and PFM's pervasive 
right to all on-campus food service needs. We acknowledge that 
this is a special area of concern and disregards the Board Opera- 
tions of PFM in general. But, the Class believes that this un- 
professionalism in catering cannot be detached from their other 
areas of operations. Rather bad management, unsanitary con- 
ditions, and second rate victuals are manifested in ALL aspects 
of PFM' s management. 

This leads me to the crux of this letter, that is, we, the Class 
1985, can no longer stand by conplacently accepting excuses in 
lieu of improvements. Therefore, be it resolved, that the Class 
of 1985 has stated and will upon request, present the facts that 
we feel should call for the removal of PFM as our Food Service. 
Finally, please disseminate this concern to the people you feel 
are empowered to act accordingly. Thank you for your attention 
and assistance in this matter. 

Respectfully submitted on the behalf of the Class of 1985. 

Craig R.C. Colwell 
President 





Whether it's the residents cafeteria or the Commuter cafe, it's not just a place to 
get nourishment. Our cafeterias are our social spot, the meeting place after 
classes and as much a pick-up spot as Bennigans. "I.D. PLEASE" 



40 



CHANGE ! 




\ /I P 



5T&RWA 



On Wednesday, September 26, 1984 the Democratic Vice 
Presidential nominee, Geraldine Ferraro, came to Boston to 
campaign for the Mondale-Ferraro ticket in the November elec- 
tion. A number of F.S.C. students went to Boston to see the first 
woman Vice-Presidential candidate for the United States. 
Among the dignitaries present at the rally were U.S. Senator 
Ted Kennedy, Lieutenant Governor and Massachusetts, 
Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate John Kerry, 
Governor Dukakis and Mayor Ray Flynn. They gathered 
together to speak to an enthusiastic crowd unintimidated by the 
damp and rainy weather. Senator Kennedy declared, "the rain 
may fall in Boston today but the sun will shine on election day 
when Mondale and Ferraro are elected into the Office of 
President and Vice President of the United States." 

Unfortunately, the Democratic party lost the election this 
year so Ferraro remained only the first women Vice Presidential 
candidate instead of becoming the first woman Vice President. 
This year she was defeated, but this year women conquered. In 
her first speech after the election, addressing a boisterously 
partisan crowd at the University of Wisconsin, an unbowed 
Ferraro said that Democrats have always "stood up for the idea 
that a nation is mightier when its people are freer. Belief in equal 
opportunity is the core of Democratic party's faith." Despite 
the results of the 1984 election she added, "the last thing we 
need is to trim our principles now . . .. " What the country will 
get, this year made clear, is more Geraldine Ferraro. 

— comprised from a story written by Lisa Martin for the 
Gatepost and Garry Clifford from TIME magazine. 




In 1968 Framingham State College opened it's doors for the first time to 
officially enroll male students. In 1985 the United State's political doors were 
opened to the admittance of woman nominee for a major office. Watch out boys, 
you never know what the 1980s' women is up to next! 



41 



CHANGE? 

One thing that hasn't changed at 
Framingham State College is the 
small private school atmosphere 
that allows students to get to know 
each other and develop close last- 
ing friendships. 





42 




"Some things Never Change!" 




43 



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A^ 4 






A PIECE OF SKY 



It all began the day I found 

that from my window 

I could only see a piece of sky. 

I stepped outside and looked around, 

I never dreamed it was so wide 

Or even half as high. 

The time had come 

To try my wings 

And even though it seemed at any 

Moment I could fall, 

I felt the most 

Amazing things, 

The things you can't imagine if 

You've never flown at all. 

Though it's safer to stay on 

The ground, 

Sometimes where danger lies 



There the sweetest of pleasures 
Are found. 

No matter where I go — there'll be 
Memories that tug at my sleeve 
But there will also be more to 
Question yet more to believe. 

The more I live — the more I learn. 

The more I learn — the more I realize 

The less I know. 

Each step I take — 

Each page I turn — 

Each mile I travel only means 

The more I have to go. 

What's wrong with wanting more? 

If you can fly — then soar! 

With all there is — why settle for 

Just a piece of sky? 



44 




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45 



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46 



never change!" 






47 



THE RAM'S DEN, 



RAMS 








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The RAM's DEN PUB ex- 
perienced a few changes this year. 
Two of these changes occurred in 
one week, it's forced closure on 
March 28 and then it's reopening 
on April 4. At first we gathered 
these to mourn it's closure, the 
very next week we gathered there 
again to celebrate it's reopening. 

As Freshmen, there was no 
"Pub" at all. The twenty year old 
upper-classmen would leave us in 
the dorms to go to the "Beer 
Bashes" in the Forum. Our 
Sophomore year brought with it 
the RAM's DEN PUB but as 
Seniors (and now "of age" 
ourselves) it seemed that there 
was constant conflict at the Pub. 
First, in November, the no dupli- 
cate I.D. policy was revoked with 
the help of 1985 Class President 
Craig Colwell. He argued that a 
valid Massachusettes I.D. was 
sufficient for out of state students, 
no need for two forms of identifi- 
cation. In March when the Pub's 
own liquor license was not 
renewed, in the words of Execu- 
tive Vice President Arthur 
Chave's "things looked very dis- 
mall." But with the efforts of Dr. 
Chaves, Trustees Edward Clasby 
and other interested parties the 
Pub's policy was extended to June 
30 and less than a week later the 
RAM'S DEN PUB was reopened. 

Whether or not the pub will 
remain opened next year is un- 
known at this time. Will we be 
visiting our old friends still at 
F.S.C. on a dry campus? Who 
knows, but we're used to change. 
We'll be able to deal with it. 



48 



OUR PLAY PEN! 




"95 bottles of beer on the wall, 95 bottles of beer ..." 




'Here's to the class of 1985!" 



What's wrong with my hat?" 



49 




The crew that keeps us in line ... so we can walk the straight line! 



50 




F.S.C. graduate never die, they just keep coming back for the girls! 




"Here's to 1985, the year COOR'S Beer came to New 
England." 



Here's Lisa Martin with a few friends. 



51 




"Welcome to my neighborhood . 
BEER?" 



can you say Here we find Lisa Martin with a few more of her 
friends. 




'I dare anyone to try and take my pitcher away!" ". . .34 bottles of beer on the wall, 34 bottles of beer. . ." 



52 



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"Dry campus? What dry campus??" 





53 



Commuter Alliance 

The Commuter Alliance is a new student organization on 
campus this year that is open to both commuters and residents. 
Its purpose is to help commuters become more involved in 
college life and to assure that commter's needs are addressed in 
the school's dicision making process. The large population of 
commuters at F.S.C. began voicing their opinions and taking 
action against the division between residents and commuters 
through Commuter Alliance and the "Commuter Survival" 
column that ran in the GATEPOST last fall. 




54 



New Solutions to an Old Problem. 

Lack of parking spaces has been an old problem at F.S.C. but 
this year there were a few new solutions for them. Instead of 
continuing to complain about the lack of parking spaces 
students got together and formed the COMMUTER 
ALLIANCE this year with hopes of coming to some of their 
own solutions about the problem. In addition to the 
COMMUTER ALLIANCE other "solutions" included the 
new Shuttle Bus and a commuter advice column in the 
GATEPOST entitled, "COMMUTER SURVIVAL" with 
helpful and humorous tips for us all. 





The new Shuttle Bus, driven by Jeff Rendell, made scheduled runs between 
Bowditch Field and F.S.C. campus. A new solution to an old problem. 



commuter survival 



by marie a. hett 




Lift that book bag, two, three. 
Hike that hill, two, three. As your 
aching muscle may be telling you 
(God knows mine are screaming to 
me) the Commuter Fitness 
Workout is enough to make Jane 
Fonda wince. Unfortunately, my 
helpful tip to lessen your burdens 
is too late to do you any good . . . 



55 



Games People Play 

The "Game Room" in the College Center serves as a fun place 
to spend between classes. The room houses pool tables and 
video machines and gives everyone a chance to try their skills in 
these extracurricular activities. 





Here a few students gather to "play." From left to right are: Mimi Thibault, Michelle Cormier, Paula Sousa, Sandy Andrews, Jennifer Harrison, Therese 
Graves, Nancy Lanza, Sue McNulty, Gerry Prince and Deanna Gordon. 



56 



Games People Play 



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The "Reverse Drinking Booth" at Sandbox-Spring 1985. 



'Tree Pitching" was a popular game this spring . . . 




The "Unknown Students" a game played by many at F.S.C. 



... as well as "Ball" Catching. 



57 



Signs of Our Time! 




Talking Coke Machine appeared around Framingham in 1985. 



MICHAEL JACKSON'S style and "Thriller" album kept him in the 1985 
spotlight. 




The rock band U-2 sang out against world politics, destruction and hatred between all people. 



SK 




erbies 

Home -Made Ice Cream 



FACTORY 





'Liquid Hairdos" and liquids in boxes are norms in our futuristic styled times. 



59 




The 1984 Bottle-Bill that put a deposit fee on every can and bottle helped F.S.C. 
raise money for new bleachers at the Football Field. 




BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN won his first Grammy Award this year for Best Rock The short skirts of the 60's and the high heels of the 50's combined make the 
Vocal Performance of "DANCING IN THE DARK," Columbia Records. "hot" fashions of the 80's. 



60 



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Firetrucks were a familiar sight on campus this year during our "fire-scare" fall. 




Bottled Blood? Not quite. Successful Blood Drives at F.S.C. passed 163 pints of The ever popular Media Department grew right out of space at Whitemore 
blood to the Red Cross this year. Library and took an added room in Pierce Hall. 



61 




Signs of Our Time! 




Friends are always a sign of any time! 



62 



SANDBOX is a "sign of our time" 
twice! Held once in the fall and again in 
the spring, F.S.C. students have the 
chance to participate in the fun two times 
each year. The new "no-alcohol" policy 
enforced this year did not interfere with 
anyone's good time. "Carnival" type 
events such as the "reverse dunking 
booth" and strolling Shakesperian Minis- 
trels filled the afternoon and the tradi- 
tional student talent and bands filled the 
evening hours. SANDBOX was a great 
time but for us Seniors it just prepared us 
for the up-coming SENIOR WEEK 
events! 




63 




Into the Night at Sandbox Nineteen! 



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64 






E '■-■■■ ' ' am- i 







Two events that occured on campus 
this year that are "Signs of All Time," 
were the performance of the Boston Bal- 
let's NUTCRACKER and the visitation 
of Teddy Kennedy Jr. The Kennedy's 
have not been around as long as this clas- 
sical ballet has been but with rumors of 
Ed. Jr.'s intentions of following in his 
family's political footsteps, the Kennedy 
influence continues in this next genera- 
tion. 

Kennedy has not announced definite 
plans to run for an official office at this 
time, however he has been involved with 
the campaigns of Senator John Kerry as 
well as his father's unsuccessful attempt 
of the Democrat's Presidential Candida- 
cy in 1984. 



Above, members of the Boston Ballet Company perform at F.S.C. in 
the NUTCRACKER. 




Edward Kennedy Jr. mixes with F.S.C. students and faculty after speaking on behalf of Massachusettes 
Senator John Kerry. 



65 



Hilltop 



The 1984-85 

Spring 

Musical 




The HILLTOP PLAYERS presented 
"A Funny Thing Happened on the Way 
to the Forum" on April eighteenth, 
nineteenth and twentieth to great reviews 
and many laughs. Local Director Merrill 
Kabler contributed his expertise to a cast 
of (count 'em) eighteen; Doug Wall, 
Charles E. Hodges Jr., Kathleen Celli, 
Neil Casey, Jennifer Robb, Robert 
Jacobs, Jim Murphy, Greg Valentini, 
Ken Cardinale, Veronica Pestilli, Karen 
Albinson, Lisa Howard, Tammy Payne, 
Marie Hett, Aj Sulivan, Robert Keyes, 
and John O'brien. Sets were designed by 
Roger Marrocco and Paul Abbott with 
Stage Direction by Russ Winslow. Cos- 
tumes by Tammy Payne and special 
thanks to magicians Donna Bouchard, 
Karen Porcello and Russ Winslow. 
Musical Direction by Gene Schwab and 
Julie Roberts. Congratulations to Presi- 
dent of the "Players" Marie Hett and 
Resa Rea, producing their way to another 
success for the HILLTOP PLAYERS! 




THING 

HAPPENED 
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DARK BOOM 
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77 



M.TA.~TODAY 




78 



Visiting Lecturer Paul Marsella addresses one of his History Classes. 



OUR 
FACULTY 

Our faculty at Framingham State Col- 
lege is a wide collection of Doctors, Pro- 
fessors, Lecturers and people with di- 
verse experiences and educations. They 
put the challenge to us and guide us and 
tempt us to accomplish those challenges. 
College is goal-setting and re-evaluating. 
It is an endurance test and the teachers of 
the twenty one departments endure it 
with us. When Professor Josephine R. 
Reiter the President of the Framingham 
State College Professional Association 
welcomed us to the 1984-85 school year 
she stated, "The challenge ahead of you 
is great. As you encounter the important 
minds and ideas of the past and present, 
as you develop your critical and analytic 
thinking abilities, as you improve your 
speaking and writing skills, and as you 
deepen your aesthetic awareness, we will 
be there — in and out of our classrooms 
and offices — to guide you and direct 
your learning." She stood before us then 
at our Graduation Ceremony and con- 
gratulated us for doing all of that and 
more. 




Dr. Arthur Goyette of the Geography Department. 






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79 




The English Department 




James Eng of the Art Department 




Mr. Joseph McCaul of the Computer Science Depart 
ment. 



81 




GREAT EVENTS IN HISTORY 
Columbus discovered America in 1492. 
English Pilgrims land in Provincetown in 1690. 
July 4, 1776 The Declaration of Independence is signed. 
Man walks on the moon 1968. 
The class of 1985 graduates from Framingham State College. 



The History Department 





82 




The Home Ec. Department 



The Nursing Department 





The Psychology Department 





84 




Media Department Television Coordinator Jeff Baker (above) observes the Here Media Students smile for our camera instead of being behind their 
action of his T.V. II class while Director of Media Walter Koroski (below) cameras, 
advises Tom Dinapoli. 





86 




Above, Dr. Joan Horrigan, Head of the Speech Department, watches the Graduation Ceremony for the Class of 1985. 




87 




The Sociology Department 




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By BOB 
OLIVEIRA 

For the person who has never seen a 
rugby game, it's really something to 
watch. It resembles soccer in the size of 
the field, the player's equipment or 
should I say lack of it, and the way the ball 
is almost always in play. It also is like 
football because of the tackling and the 
way the points are scored. It's a very 
rough, but very entertaining game. 

Although rugby is very physical, it's 
not just a "kill the guy with the ball" kind 
of game. It is often disciplined and exact 
in the ways the ball is passed from player 
to player, which look to be according to 
set plays. 

The Rugby Team at Framingham State 
College has been in existence for two 
years now and has greatly strengthened 
their program since the Spring of "83" 
when Paul Wisse initiated the first season 
of rugby here at the college. Since then 
they have expanded to both Spring and 
Fall seasons, along with increasing the 
number of players to nearly two teams of 
fifteen players in the Fall and over thirty 
players in the Spring. 

The Rugby Team, for its two years, has 
been playing without an official coach. 
Instead of any one man coaching the 
team, it is coached and run by veteran 
players. Veterans include Seniors; Mike 
Charnley, Bill Magnusen, Keith Faulkner 
and Rick McGrath, along with Junior, 
Will Harpster. Keith is acting President 
for the team with Rick as treasurer, and 
Mike as secretary. 

Most of the coaching is done by Will 
Harpster with the help of Mike Charnley. 
Both Will and Mike are veteran players of 
the Beacon Hill Rugby Team. One of the 
top rated Rugby teams in Boston, which 
boasts a player from the U.S. National 
Team that competed in the Los Angeles 
Olympics. They are probably the most 
experienced of the group of veterans. 



90 




Sometimes coaching, always playing hard, these Senior Captains keep the 
Rugby ball moving. From left are; Mike Charnley. Bill Magnusen and Keith 
Faulkner. 




The Ram's Rugby Team is from left, (first row) Al Craven, John Braden. Mike Moles. Paul . and Jonathan Welsh (second row) John Masterson. Brian 

Earley, Tod Larson, John Macnamara, Tom Charnley. Rick McGrath. Paul Ring. Mike Jordan, Troy Chicoine, John Irwin. Dave Royal and Tom Haskins. 
(third row) Seniors, Mike Charnley. Bill Magnusen and Keith Faulkner. Not pictured is Kevin Mulhall opposite page. 




, 



-1 P I m ill ■ , r r t — r- 

This is Ivan Slovan reporting as Jim Burke receives a double ball play." 






Football Players from left to right are Jack Flinter, Ed Tamuleviz (in suit), Dave McDermott, Tom Kelley (Coach), Steve Oakes (with ball), Steve Meger and 
Chris Horblit. 



93 



VOLLEYBALL 




Volleyball is a strange sport in that 
each night's performance can be different 
from the last. The strong points and the 
weak points of a team's showing can 
change with every game. Therefore, a 
team can only try to improve as much as 
possible in the basics such as serving, and 
shooting. Only after the Rams have gone 
through a few matches do they get a bet- 
ter idea of what areas they are improving 
in and what they need to work harder on 
in practice. Something is possibly look 
for in each match is someone who is play- 
ing unusually good in one or more skills 
that particular night. With few experi- 
enced players (no Seniors) the team is still 
growing. When the team is playing well 
together, showing a lot of intensity, 
Coach Lindgren tries to keep them fired 
up. A team seems to play well when play- 
ing with alot of intensity, and as long as 
they can keep it that way, they will con- 
tinue to play tough and win points. 




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94 



EQUESTRIAN TEAM 



Equestrian means rider or riding and 
this year the team had 40 people trying 
out for the team. There are 16 people on 
the team (14 regular and 2 alternates); 7 
veterans from last year. Few people real- 
ize that Equestrian is not only a fall sport 
but a Spring sport as well. It is also a 
co-ed team but thee tarn has no male rid- 
ers. FSC is part of the Intercollegiate 
Horse Show Association which involves 
25 states and 112 colleges. 

Head Captain Carol Besgen, a liberal 
studies major in Equestrian Studies, 
reorganized and restructured the team in 
the Fall of 1982. One of her goals is to get 
the team into Varsity standing because 
right now they are inbetween club and 
varsity. To become a varsity team they 
must have an advisor to support them. 
Carol is very happy with the team be- 
cause there is good team spirit, a lot of 
enthusiasm and there are twice as many 
people that came out for the team this 
year as there were last year. 




In the Homecoming Parade the Equestrian Team took Second Place. 




95 



CROSS COUNTRY 



The Crosscountry team, under Head 
Coach Ned Price, headed into the '84 sea- 
son with a small team, but with some 
talented runners. The best of which is a 
sophomore transfer students from Wel- 
lesly College by the name of Art Blodgett. 
Art in his first meet for the Rams , not only 
came in first, but the school record for the 
4.8 mile course with a time of 25:02, bet- 
tering the prior record time of 5:08 set by 
now Senior John Fields. 

Stack that up with senior Rick Smith's 
fifth place performance of 26:12 (his per- 
sonal best) and a very good eighth place 
finish by Freshman Dan Hawkins and 
you had a very ohtimistic view of the 
team's chances this year. 

Although there were no elected cap- 
tains this year, the natural choice of lead- 
er would by John Fields, according to 
Coach Price. Although Rick Smith is also 
a Senior and a quality runner, this was 
only his second year of College Competi- 
tion. John Fields, on the other hand, has 
been in the hrogram for three years and 
this was his fourth year of competition at 
the College level. 

Fields, who was All-Conference at 
Maynard High School, is in the words of 
Coach Price, "the best overall runner 
we've ever had here ..." 

Running is not known as a "hit-em," 
"rock-em-sock-em" contact sport which 
is why the collision between Mary Deck- 
er (at right) and Zola Budd during the 
3,000 meters race at the 1984 Summer 
Olympics drew so much attention. In the 
last moments of the race Decker, the 
leader and expected winner, fell to the 
ground as Budd "unintentionally" 
bumped her off the track to win the race 
as waves of boos crashed down on her. 
This summer Decker got revenge by beat- 
ing Budd in an English Championship. 
Decker, satisfied yet not compensated for 
her Olympic defeat, toasted her victory 
and her presence at the 1988 Olympics. 




96 






Can you identify this picture: If you're an athlete at Framingham State College you probably 
can. This is an outside view of the locker room where our athletes ready themselves for the 
games that they play in Division III Athletics. 



97 



SOCCER 



Women 




A steady improvement over the course 
of the season resulted in a 7-5-1 record 
and a bid to the MAIA W Division Three 
Tournament. Although the team carried a 
relatively low number of players (14) for a 
soccer team the enthusiasm remained 
high. With a competitive schedule in 
place, the team continued to make its 
presence known thereby gaining respect 
from opponents for their aggressive style 
and competitive spirit. 

A quick check of game results reflects a 
slow start building into a strong finish 
which, coincidentally, was the hallmark 
for almost every game. The admirable 
qualities evident from the players that 
they injected into their play were commit- 
ment, pride, determination and spunk 
even though fatigue often became their 
second opponent. Over the past three 
seasons this tenacity has become the 
mark of Framingham soccer; the consis- 
tant desire to finish strong. 



Men 



It may be said that this team is one of 
the better kept sports secrets on campus, 
but the reasons for our success to date are 
certainly no secret to us. The contribu- 
tion by several key players such as Senior 
Co-Captain Maureen McPhee whose ath- 
letic prowess and intelligent play 
anchored a tough defense (midfielder 
Helene Walls is the only other senior on 
the team). Junior Barbara Canavan made 
things happen with her exceptional ball 
control and endless energy. Sparkling 
performances by the goalkeepers Sopho- 
mores Bridgett Kane and the ever steady 
poised freshman Chris Grant combined 
for a modest 28 goals against our 2.3 GPG 
average. 

While we're on the subject of Soccer, 
the Men's coach could not be reached for 
comments but we did pick up on some 
information about the team. This year's 
men's soccer team had eighteen players 
with only six returning veterans. Greg 
Allen, the only Senior, notes that they 
were a very young team, yet enthusiastic 
and worked well together. 



98 



1 




RAMS SPORTS TODAY 





.', 



HOCKEY 



On a team where 16 of the 19 players 
are underclassmen, leadership is a com- 
modity that you don't usually benefit 
from. But captains Frank Pisa and Rich 
Russo have more than provided it for the 
Rams, something highly important with a 
team as young as this year's was. Frank 
and Rich have finished their hockey 
careers for the Rams after graduating this 
year and although the value of a person's 
leadership is something that's hard to 
measure, both have helped the Rams on 
their way to becoming the powerful team 
that they will be in the next two years. 




Eric Donaghey enroute to one of his three goals in the St. Michael's game. 







Chris Shanahan lets go with a slapshot which helped the Rams win this game against St. Michaels. 



100 



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Salute to '84 Rams 





102 




The Ram's Men's Basketball team 
made it to the quarter-finals of the EC AC 
Tournament this year playing almost 
error free basketball only to loose to Con- 
necticut College with a 89-70 score. 

Despite the large spread between 
scores, the Rams were able to hang close 
with the Camels as long as Rod Valerie 
kept sinking those outside jumpers. In the 
last game of the Ram's season, Connecti- 
cut College didn't allow Framingham 
State many second shots late in the half 
and used that advantage to build a nine 
point halftime lead, 40-31, which the 
Rams never recovered. 

Rich Corbett led the Rams with 24 
points while Rod Valerie added 17. Soph- 
omore guard Gerry Walsh had a season 
high 15 assists for FSC. All in all, Fra- 
mingham State had a fine season and will 
only improve next year. Perhaps even 
going for the title. 




103 




104 




105 



By Janice Tibbetts 

Six rookies joined three veterans on the 
FSC women's basketball team to play 
what Coach Bill Craig refers to as "one of 
the toughest schedules in Division III." 

Over the past five months, the Ram 
women matched up with such division 
ranked teams as Bridgewater State, 
Salem State, Worcester State, Clark Uni- 
versity and WPI. 

In total, they played 24 games (14 
away, 10 home), picked up eight wins and 
never let the other team walk off the court 
with an easy win. 

The talents of rookie and veteran alike 
were used to the fullest as Coach Craig, 
his assistant Tom Lipsky and the women 
strove to bring the excitement and com- 
petition of women's basketball back to 
Framingham State. 

Not only have they scored as a whole 
with the fans and the opposition, they 
have scored locally and nationally in the 
Massachusetts State Colleges Athletic 
Conference (MASCAC) the ECAC and 
the NCAA. 




Point Guard Beth Toppin brings the ball up the court under pressure from North Adams State College. 



GIRLS BASKETBALL 



106 



SOFTBALL 



After a heavy season, the Ram's 
Women's Softball team played two awe- 
some away games against Westfield State 
on April 27. The Ram's defense held 
Westfield to only 2 runs in the first game 

! and 3 runs in the second game. 

Moe McPhee playing some of her best 

■ defense at short-stop and Beth Kerrigan 

\ making some "Jim Rice" put-outs at 
Center Field were two factors in keeping 
the games tight. The final score was 2-1 

' and 3-0 Westfield. 

With only 9 players per game and a 
heavy schedule the Rams have done very 

i well. The other scores of the end of the 
season were; 7-5 and 10-5 Fitchburg, 
Wheaton 8-0, and Tufts 16-10. 




■ 

Assistant Coach, Dan Elliott, talks strategy with the Softball team. 




107 




108 




. 



109 



BASEBALL HIGHLIGHTS 




The Framingham State Rams did a 
number on Anna Maria College, embar- 
rassing them something terrible, 31-10 
Wednesday April 24. 

The Rams got three homers in the con- 
test, a two-run homer in the fourth by 
Frank Malzone, and two-run homers 
from Bob Lawton and Steve Plante in the 
sixth. 

Tom Winand went six strong innings to 
get the win, striking out nine and now 
walks in a two hitter. Billy Rose came in 
to finish the job. The Rams wound up the 
season with a 13-16-1 overall and for the 
conference, winning half, 7-6-1. 




110 





112 




w~r*.t-m; !■■■' 



113 



Trivial 



TRIVIAL PURSUIT was the board game introduced in 1984 that gave the game board industry a shot of adrenalin. Before 
we knew it, there were "Trivial Pursuit Parties" and competitions all over the place. By the Holiday Season this year 
TRIVIAL PURSUIT games were sold out, rush orders and lines for adults compared with the CABBAGE PATCH DOLL 
buying lines for children. 

Two Canadian Journalists began the trivia craze and now there are many versions of the original game; Trivial Sports 
Pursuit, Entertainment Tonight's Trivial Pursuit and so on. The DIAL has comprised our own small version of the TRIVIAL 
PURSUIT game, ala FRAMINGHAM STATE COLLEGE PURSUIT. The answers can be found in this very Yearbook, 
however if you'd like the easy-out, the back of the yearbook lists the correct answers . See how well you know the school you 
spent the last four (or more) years at! 



1. Who were the 1984 Homecoming King and 
Queen? 

2. What was the name of FSC's retiring 
President? 

3. How long was the Ram's Den Pub closed 
this spring? 

4. Who was the Class of 1985's Valedictorian? 

5. What "change" did the College Center 
Building go through this year? 



114 



Pursuit 




115 




6. What mock celebrity "appeared" at 
Sandbox 18? 

7. What events did the THIRD WORLD 
ORGANIZATION sponsor this year? 

8. What department does Dr. Horrigan head? 

9. How many graduated in the class of 1985? 

10. What musical did the HILLTOP 
PLAYERS produce this year? 



116 




117 




1 1 . What new organization is bringing new 
solutions to an old problem? 

12. What Senior Week event involved a boat? 

13. Who is the President of the Class of 1985? 

14. What Campus organization emphasizes 
"involvement"? 

15. Who was the female who ran on the 
Democrat's Presidential ticket? 



118 









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16. What is the most popular yet unofficial 
club at FSC? 

17. Who was this year's DIAL Editor? 

18. What family includes a FSC professor and 
a 1985 Graduate? 

19. What year were men officially enrolled at 
FSC? 

20. Where did a large group of FSC students 
go on Spring Break? 



120 






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121 




21. Who was FSC's acting President for the 
1984-85 school year? 

22. What day did the Class of 1985 graduate? 

23. What popular event happens twice a year 
at FSC? 

24. What popular beverage was made available 
to New England this year? 

25. Who was the DIAL Photo Editor? 



122 




123 




26. What magazine ran an article on WDJM? 

27. What is the FSC literary magazine's name? 

28. Who captained the FSC Rugby team? 

29. How many Seniors did not have their 
Senior Portrait taken? 

30. What organization sponsors most of FSC's 
social events? 



124 




125 




31. Where can you find many FSC sunbathers? 

32. What was the name of the world's first 
animal-heart-transplant recipient? 

33. Who was the GATEPOST Editor this 
year? 

34. Who captained the FSC Hockey team? 

35. What is the WDJM "mascot"? 



126 




127 




36. Who was a guest speaker at 
Commencement? 

37. What Rock Band closed SANDBOX 18? 

38. What is a "sign of our time?" 

39. How long has the FSC Rugby team been in 
existence? 

40. Who won his first Grammy this year? 



128 




129 




41. What "magazine cover" introduces the 
Class and Club Section? 

42. What teams are not shown in this 
yearbook? 

43. What does "Equestrian" mean? 

44. Who is the DIAL'S "Man of the Year"? 

45. What club sponsors the FSC Fashion 
Show? 



130 



I 











46. How many pages in this DIAL? 

47. What event Preceeds Commencement? 

48. Who performed the NUTCRACKER at 
FSC? 

49. What can be donated to the FSC Bleacher 
Fund? 

50. Why did the Ram's Den Pub close this 
spring? 



132 





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51. How many years was Dr. McCarthy 
President at FSC? 

52. What was the new policy at SANDBOX 
19? 

53. What is FSC's law enforcement called? 

54. What word describes the last year? 

55. What vehicle helps commuters get to 
campus from Bowditch Field? 



134 











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56. What was HOMECOMING 1984 titled? 

57. Who is FSC's best over all Crosscountry 
runner? 

58. Who announced the FSC Football games? 

59. Who's picture keeps popping up in this 
yearbook? 

60. Which Kennedy spoke at FSC this year? 



136 





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137 




61. How many cast members were in 
HILLTOP'S production this year? 

62. What Department awarded the most 
diplomas? 

63. In what month did Spring Break occur in 
this year? 

64. What's another name for SENIOR 
WEEK? 

65. How many Dorms are there at FSC? 



138 




139 




66. What is the "Filene's" of FSC? 

67. Who is the President of SGA? 

68. Where was SENIOR WEEK's first event 
held? 

69. What was the Baseball team's over-all 
"stat"? 

70. How many instructors are there in the 
Physical Education Department? 



140 




141 




El 



71. Where do all good students go? 

72. Who sponsors HOMECOMING? 

73. How many photographers contributed to 
the DIAL? 

74. SENIOR COUNTDOWN began how many 
days before Graduation? 

75. How many "Dorm Fires" were there at 
FSC? 



142 



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76. Who is the President of the United States? 

77. What is the name of FSC's new Food 
Service? 

78. Where can you find Video Games on 
Campus? 

79. What do the radio station's initials stand 
for? 

80. When did the Ram's Den Pub open? 



144 




145 




81. Where did the "Booze Cruise" sail to? 

82. Where do SANDBOX spectators sit? 

83. Where did the Women's Soccer Team 
finish their season? 

84. What replaced "Centre Pizza"! 

85. What did the Class of 1985 donate to 
Framingham State College? 



146 



h 







US! 



We've seen all the clubs, the faculty, 
the events, the signs of our time, the 
changes . . . now it's time for us! The 
Graduating Class of 1985. There were 519 
of us with degrees ranging from Food and 
Nutrition to Computer Science. There 
were seven graduating with Summa Cum 
Laude honors; Mary Cerillo, Margeret 
Spencer Codner, Carleen Daly, Joan 
Georgalis, Juliet Sleeman, Carol Baker 
and Nancy Stearns. The Economics De- 
partment awarded the most degrees with 
77 recipients with the Psychology Depart- 
ment coming in second awarding 49 un- 
dergraduate degrees. 

But before we actually graduated we 
took some time to celebrate and boy did 
we have fun. It's traditionally called SEN- 
IOR WEEK but we just call it a good 
time . . . 





'Booze Cruise" around Boston Harbor 











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. well, party anyway! 



The "Comedy Stop" in the FSC Forum 



149 



Yes, for the last time in their FSC 
Careers, Gerri Prince and Leigh McElroy 
are selling tickets. They always say 
"Save the best for last" and Gerri and 
Leigh did just that for here they sell tick- 
ets for the Senior Week events. 




The first stop for SENIOR WEEK was a bus trip to PUFFERBELLIES in Hyanis. Rosemary looks like she's equipped for the bus ride down! 



150 




BEFORE 



AFTER 



151 




152 







153 



COMEDY STOP 




154 




'I bet you didn't get that one!" 



155 



Boston Harbor Cruise 




'One for the road" 



156 




157 




158 




159 



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161 



Campus Police Softball Game 

Students Seek Revenge! 




162 




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170 






171 




172 






173 




174 





175 





177 



Black and White Night 




178 



Graduation 



And now, the moment we've all been 
waiting for, GRADUATION! A time of 
reflecting and looking forward. A time for 
memories. A time to sigh in relief and say 
"hey, that wasn't so bad." A time for 
"coming-togethers" and saying good- 
bye. Some made it through with smiles, 
others with tears, but on May 26, 1985 the 
speeches were made, the diplomas hand- 
ed out and the cheers exploded! 






To: Jennifer Long 

From: Lisa Graceffa 

It's been an unforgettable 2 years. I'm going to miss our late 

night talks, as well as our friendly ghost in room 306. Thanks Jen 

for everything! Good Luck, Roomie! Love always, Lisa 



Charlene Elvers: Thanks for everything! You are the BEST!! 

Lou 



MAO: Quit! Who needs those kids, cars, or japs. ME. 



Patty L. : Looks like we made it ! Thanks for being a great friend 

— Let's stay in touch! 

Sue 




180 




Our "us" cover boy was all smiles on the way to getting his diploma. 




'Here they come a-jus-a walkin' down the aisle!' 



181 




Mandy Brannigan — CONGRATULATIONS! — I'll miss ya! To Rob P. — You're the greatest! Thanks for all your support 

during my F.S.C. years 



To 6th floor Lamed — DL, SL, CS 

From the one without a nickname TO Rose, Gumby, Jayne, and Farina: GOOD LUCK! Come 

I'll miss you guys and our past four years! Now instead of back and visit! 

studying we'll have more time for partying. Love you guys — From: 3rd and Dianne 




Kathy Young's ever present smile will be missed. 



182 




'We've got legs!" 




Guest Speaker Dr. William P. Castelli, 1985 Honorary Degree Recipient. 



1985 Valedictorian, Mary Lee Cerillo 



183 





To June and Ruth, To Maureen O'Donnell: 

We made it through student-teaching with a 4.0. YEAH! From Carol Corriveau 

Linda I never thought that I would be so lucky to get a roommate like 

you. Thanks for being such a good friend for the past four years! 

I Love You — I'll miss you to DL and SL. 



Dear Paula, 
To Meave Foley: Adios — Good Luck in all you do. We will You're a great person and an even better friend. Thanks for 
miss you! Keep in touch! everything. I'll miss you. 

The Puttas Love ya 

P.S.: See you in Spain Tricia 




Make way for the Media Communications Majors! 



184 



r^bt*.. 





Executive Vice President Chaves awards Honorary Degree Recipient Ella 
Griffin. 



185 






To Maureen, Sue McNulty: 

Living in 623 Lamed Hall with you for four years and we're You really helped make senior year the best! Always remember 
seniors will stay with me for the rest of my life! the binges we went on — Senior Countdown, etc. Best of luck in 

Love, Grad. School. 
Your Roommate C. Love, 

Patty 



Bye Mandy — 

Take Care and Keep Smiling! 
DAS 



To: The College Center Crew 

The blessed one returns — Blessed be Landreaux 





186 





Dr. Previte gives his son Chris a proud embrace as he leaves with his diploma. 



Class President, Craig Col well 




187 




To 3rd floor Horace Mann: 
From a warm hug (of course) JT 

I'm so glad you guys were a part of my college life. I have had 
the BEST times with you from our Blizzard Hawaiin Party, 
Monticello, to Norwich Weekend (Happy Campers!) The close 
relationship between all of us is so special and unique that I hope 
it lasts a lifetime. You guys are the best! I Love You! 

To the"Rat Busters", 

I had a great time on Halloween but please don't take your 

masks off. 

Love, 
Moon Beam 



I'll miss you guys — Marsha, Carleen, and MoMo 



Love, 
Carol 



To my roommate Micki, 

Thanks so much for all the great times we have had over four 

years. You have been the greatest friend. I'll miss you. 

Love ya, 
Geri 




188 




Now that the studying (and sweating) is over, Graduates have alot to laugh about. 




189 




1984-85 Acting President, Dr. Philip Dooher. 





191 




To Carolyn Taylor Liz Russo, 

From Lori Colletto You've been such a good friend. I hope we always keep in 

I know I kid you a lot, but you've been an inspiration. I'll miss touch. Keep Smiling! Good Luck — You've got what it takes to | 
you next semester! be successful. 

Love, I 
Sue 



Mary G., 
To: Tricia and Paula on 3 center CONGRATULATIONS! 

From: the one you loved to aggrevate. Your antics are strange, Love, 
you make me insane, but when you leave college I'll miss ya! Gumby 





'The long and winding road 




193 




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194 



Li 




"You've come a long way, baby! 




195 




Phil Reilly, 

Keep asking questions and you will never be without an answer. 
You've been my best critic. Good Luck in whatever you do. 

LUV, 
Sue 



To 3rd floor Horace Mann: 

It's been four good years! Reunion at the Statue of Liberty! 



To Jane C. 
Hi QTtt, 

Keep wishing upon that shining star! May the future bring 
faith, hope, and love into your life. Reach out for those dreams. 

Love Always, 
Rich P. 



To Diane Buonopane 

From Kathy Dearden and Helen Roth 

Wish you were celebrating graduation with us to make the 

"Three Musketeers" complete. 



^ii^ 







196 




Congratulations to the Class of 1985! 



197 





David N. Aduba 

Economics 



Charles D. Anderson III 

ECT 



Phillip C. Andiauer 

Computer Science 



Laura L. Andrews 

Art 





Sandra K. Andrews 

Early Childhood Education 



Michele Anniballi 

Spanish 



George Armstrong 

Media Communications 



Anne M. Augustini 

Economics 






Sally B. Ayotte 

Food-Nutrition 



Joanne L. Baglinski 



Carol J. Baker 

Food-Nutrition 



Donna Barisano 

Media Communications 



198 




Moroney Bartholomew 

Psychology 



Jamie A. Batchelder 

Food-Nutrition 



Mary E. Beaudoin 

Media Communications 



Lori J. Bennett 

Biology Medical 




Debra A. Berestin 

Economics 



Mary Bergeron 

Childhood Education 



Robert J. Berube 

Computer Science 



Carol R. Besgen 

Liberal Arts 





Kelley Beth 

Psychology 



Karen J. Bjorkman 

Textiles 



Rose Marie Botto 

Art 



Barbara Boudreau 

Math 



199 




Ann E. Boyea 

Psychology 



Jonna M. Branigan 

Psychology 



Susanne Brouillette 

Food-Nutrition 



Lynne A. Buccigross 

Economics 




Diane F. Buonopane 

Food-Nutrition 



James F. Burke Jr. 

Economics 



Michael J. Burke 

Sociology 



Lori A. Caldwell 

Computer Science 




Patricia Cappelletti 

Economics 



Adriana Cardetti 

Elementary Education 



Kenneth R. Cardinale 

English 



Diane M. Carney 

Cloth-Textiles 



200 







Lisa R. Caserta 

English 



John F. Casey 

Economics 



Sandra L. Cause 

Psychology 



John Cavanaugh 

Political Science 






Marylee Ceriello 

Psychology 



Michael F. Charnley 

Political Science 



Laura Cid 

Art 



John P. Ciesinski 

Economics 




Mark E. Cohen 

Economics 



Craig R.C. Colwell 

Political Science 



Carol A. Corriveau 

Sociology 



Jean M. Costa 

Economics 



201 




Jane M. Costello 

Medical Technology 



Ella T. Coughtry 

Psychology 



Robert P. Coutinho 

Chemistry 



Patricia A. Cowie 

Cloth-Textiles 




Jean M. Crossman 

Economics 



Cynthia C. Crowell-Feeley 

Sociology 



Marianne Cusick 

Computer Science 




Lori J. Dalessandro 




Maureen T. Davis 

Childhood Education 



Kathleen Dearden 

Food Science 



Anne M. DeCenzo 

Math 



Michelle DeCoste 

Childhood Education 



202 




Richar A. Delorie 

History 



Steven R. Desjardin 

Economics 



Nancy Diamond 

Economics 



Ester M. Dias 




Octavio Dilucio 

History 



Cheryl A. Dimento 

Art History 



Laurie A. Donahue 

History 



Karen Doyle 

Food-Nutrition 




Lisa DuFries 

Media Communications 



Cathy A. Dunham 

Spanish 



Rosemary E. Durant 

Psychology 



Bettina V. Dustin 

Clothing Textiles 



203 




Patricia C. Dwight 

English 



Brian A. Earley 

Geography 



Joseph B. Eckman 

Biology 



Ann K. Eldridge 

Sociology 





Christopher Eldridge 

Economics 



Loren J. Ellis 

Earth Sciences 



Karen M. Ells 

Food-Nutrition 



Dawn E. Engdahl 

Bio-Med 





Ruth I. Erickson 

Art 



Patricia A. Erwin 

French 



Lisa J. Falco 

Biology 



Brenda Famiano 

Medical Technology 



204 




Linda M. Fannon 



Keith E. Faulkner 

Psychology 



Lori Fenneuff 



Beth Ferran 

Geography 





_' "-■■■■- 







John M. Fields 

Food-Nutrition 



Lauren Fitzpatrick 

English 



Lisa M. Fitzpatrick 

Economics 



Meave Foley 

Spanish 






A' 




Christopher Foster 

History 



Tina Fowler 

Psychology 



Paul R. Francoise 

Economics 




Steven B. Frasco 

Economics 



205 




Margaret Gillis 

Early Childhood Education 



Mary E. Girard 

Psychology 



Robert J. Girling 

Economics 



Maureen I. Golgata 

Art 




Joan D. Goodwin 

Economics 



Carol A. Goulet 

Economics 



Susan B. Green 

Psychology 



Tracey Greenwood 

History 



206 




Angela M. Griffith 

Psychology 



Patricia Guillette 

Economics 



Eric C. Hail 

Economics 



William D. Halsing 

Math 




V 



Mary G. Hamawi 

Psychology 




Cathy Hanafin 

Spanish 



Donna Marie Hanlon 

Media Communications 



Cheryl A. Hannon 

Economics 




Jacqueline A. Harold 

Dietetics 





Eileen P. Henning 

Sociology 



Shirley A. Hohman 

Math 



207 




Susan B. Honekamp 

Clothing Textiles 



Lynn J. Honland 

Clothing Textiles 



Elizabeth Hornstra 

Food-Nutrition 



Joyce Marie Howes 

Childhood Education 




Andrea M. Howlett 



Naomi L. Hutt 



Rhona C. Jarmulowicz 

Early Childhood Education 



Eric P. Johnson 

Psychology 




Grace P. Johnson 

Food-Nutrition 



Robert Johnson 

Media Communications 



Brenda K. Jones 

Food-Nutrition 



Sharon A. Jones 

Psychology 



208 




Robert A. Juliano 

Economics 



John E. Keating 

Computer Science 



Joanne Deaveney 

Food-Nutrition 



Louetta E. Keene 

Psychology 




Jane Kelley 

Economics 



Jay G. Kelley, Jr. 

Economics 



Alexandra H. Kelso 

Consumer Economics 



Karyln M. Kilroy 

Economics 




Cherie M. Knight 

Food-Nutrition 



Stanley Kutzko 

Economics 



Erick J. Lahme 

Economics 



Scott A. Laman 

Computer Science 



209 




Nancy A. Lanza 

Clothing Textiles 



Lorraine A. Lebel 

Food- Nutrition 



Lisa J. Leduc 

Food-Nutrition 



Susan Mary Lee 

Economics 




Gisele T. Legere 

Economics 



Lillian J. Lennard 

Psychology 



Elizabeth T. Leone 



Hayden R. Lever 
and Son 

Economics and Day Care 





Patricia C. Levesque 

Food-Nutrition 



Juliana Liatsos 

Clothing Textiles 



Dorothy M. Lombardi 

Media Communications 



Patricia L. Lowther 

English 



210 






Genevieve Macdonald 

Psychology 



Doreen Macomber 

Biology 



Keith A. Macpherson 

Psychology 



Kevin MacPherson 

Economics 




Kathleen A. Madden 

Food-Nutrition 



L 




Susan M. Magliozzi 

Food-Nutrition 



William E. Magnuson 

Economics 



Deborah A. Mahan 

Economics 




*R 




Ann Mahoney 

Consumer and Family Studies 



Mary E. Mahoney 

Food-Nutrition 



Beatrice M. Mahr 

Psychology 



Robert E. Malone 

Economics 



211 




Deborah K. Mark 

Art 



Diana Marsden 

Economics 



Ivonne Martin 

Med-Tech 



Lisa Martin 

Spanish 




Janine A. Marzuard 

Economics 



Brenda L. Matall 

Bio-Med 



Glenn S. Matto 

English 



John M. Mazzola 

Sociology 




Martha L. McCagg 

Clothing Textiles 



Lee A. McElroy 

Political Science 



Gregory E. McGowan 

Psychology 



Karen McGrath 

Elementary Education 



212 




Robert J. McManus 

Economics 



Susan A. McNuIty 

Political Science 



Maureen L. McPhee 



Carleen Meause 

Economics 





Gianna M. Melone 

Clothing Textiles 



Randy J. Michaelson 

Clothing Textiles 



Michael Michon 

Physiology 



Patricia Miklusis 

Psychology 




Pamela C. Molloy 

Media Communications 



Christopher Mooney 

History 



Mary E. Moreschi 

Computer Science 



Kathleen M. Morris 

Food-Nutrition 



213 




Renee M. Morris 

Psychology 




Susan M. Mull ins 

Clothing Textiles 



Peter P. Mundy 

Psychology 



Glenn J. Murphy 

Sociology 




Kathleen P. Nally 

Sociology 



Kathryn A. Naujalis 

Economics 



Linda L. Nichols 

Medical Technology 



Maureen T. Obrien 

Clothing Textiles 



i 





Collen M. Odea 

Sociology 



Maureen O'Donnell 



John J. Odonoghue 

Economics 



Beth E. O'Grady 

Consumer and Family 
Studies 



214 





IX ft 




Jennifer O'Hara 

Psychology 



Kimberly A. Okeefe 

Food-Nutrition 



Eileen A. Oleary 

Elementary Education 



John Oneil 

Economics 





Terriann Paletsky 

Fashion 



Paula J. Panciocco 

Psychology 



Carolyn J. Pano 

Food-Nutrition 



Geraldine Persiani 

Economics 




Richard Petrillo 

Biology 




Elizabeth Phillips 

Psychology 



Warner H. Pierce 

Biology 



Deborah E. Place 

Food-Nutrition 



215 







>• 




Anne M. Poitras 

Food-Nutrition 



Gregory E. Powers 

Economics 



Christopher Previte 

Media Communications 



Donald Prince 

Computer Science 




Cyndi Prunier 

Media Communications 



Angel Rauseo 

Liberal Arts 



Linda Regas 

Elementary Education 



William B. Reilly 





1 






Andy Reydon 

Computer Science 



Patricia E. Ritchie 

Psychology 



Lori A. Rivers 



Donna C. Roberto 

Food-Nutrition 



216 




Jody L. Robison 

Fashion 



Dianne Rogodzinski 

Clothing Textiles 



Helen A. Roth 

Food-Nutrition 



David M. Rubin 

Geography 




Margaret O. Rubino 

Clothing Textiles 



Richard A. Russo 



Kenneth G. Sallale 

Computer Science 



Robert M. Sanderson 

Computer Science 




Marie E. Santella 

Food-Nutrition 



Maura Scardocci 

Clothing Textiles 




Diana L. Scott 

Food-Nutrition 



Dawn Sexton 

Psychology 



217 




\ ■"' ■ H' Am 




Linda A. Shaughnessy 

Biology 



Maria L. Sheehan 

Media Communications 



Nancy Shular 

Med-Tech 



Dimitri K. Skrepetos 

Political Science 




Juliet P. Sleeman 

Math 



Patricia L. Small 



Beth Ellen Smith 

Media Communications 



Kelley A. Smith 

Clothing Textiles 




Marsha Snell 

Economics 



Tracey L. Spencer 

Psychology 




Barbara A. Spiri 

Home Economics 



Paul B. Martin 



218 




Lesley F. Stanley 

Food-Nutrition 



Mary Ann Stefanelli 

Consumer and Family Studies 



Karen Sturgis 



Beverly A. Sullivan 

Food-Nutrition 





Elizabeth Sullivan 

Elementary Education 



Wayne D. Sullivan 

Spanish 



Dawn R. Talley 

Economics 



Susan M. Talman 

Economics 




'% 




John F. Tavares 

Computer Science 



Carolyn I. Taylor 

English 



Jayne H. Taylor 

Computer Science 



Sandra Lea Tedstone 

Economics 



219 




ji'&mt. 




Eleanor M. Teehan 

Biology 



Carole E. Theriault 

Food-Nutrition 



John A. Thornquist 

Art 



Charles D. Thyne 




Dianne Timmins 

Sociology 



James F. Tobin 

Geography 



Laurie Vasta 

Biology 



Rita M. Vergona 

Economics 




Karen E. Vlass 

Political Science 




Lawrence L. Waithe 

Media Communications 



Terry Waller 

Sociology 



Helene Ann Walls 

Geography 



220 




Sharon Ware 

Biology 



Sherrill K. Ware 

Economics 



Lisa A. Weiner 

Psychology 




Renee M. Welling 




Stacy J. West 

Biology 



Carolyn A. Williams 

Spanish 



Kellie A. Wilson 

Clothing Textiles 



Daniel M. Wood 

Computer Science 




Virginia A. Wright 



Mary Esther Wyand 

Medical Technology 



Barbara L. Zywien 

Economics 



Patricia-Ann Zwonik 

Early Childhood Education 



221 




Greg Valentini. Photo Editor 



THANKS! 



Many thanks to all of the contributing photographers that lent 

their talent to the DIAL! 

John McCracken David Piantedosi 

Kelly Welby Mimi Thibaull 

Jeff Spence Lisa DuFries 

Paul Murphy Sherry Ware 

Phil Reilley Steve Reitter 

Mark Waters Sue Ayalaan 

Jeff DePaolo Nancy Silvcrstre 

Mike Tonelli David Schwarts 

And an extra special "Thank You" to Bob Oliveira for his 
sports articles! 



222 




"FSC PURSUIT ANSWERS" 




Now that you've got your College Diploma, you feel pretty smart don't you? Learning doesn't end with College, our minds 
can never absorb enough knowledge. The information in our FRAMINGHAM STATE COLLEGE PURSUIT game isn't 
earth shattering but it is information that you should be familiar with assuming that you were an active, participating senior at 
Framingham State College. Even if you weren't at all of the events, we hope that the DIAL will be a good reference for all of 
this year's activities, so in years to come you will be able to look at it and remember what life at Framingham State College was 
like. 

How well did you do? Check your answers with correct answers on the next page. 



223 



4 (. 



FSC PURSUIT ANSWERS" 



1 . Kevin Malloy and Jodie Rafus 

2. Dr. D. Justin McCarthy 

3. One Week 

4. Mary Cerillo 

5. A new clock and the building's name 

6. "Michael Jackson" 

7. Black Awareness Week, Ram Jam 

8. Speech Department 

9. 519 

10. "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the 
Forum" 

1 1 . Commuter Alliance 

12. Harbor Cruise 

13. Craig Colwell 

14. SGA (and SUAB) 

15. Geraldine Ferraro 

16. "Hang Out on the Wall" Club 

17. Lisa DuFries 

18. The Prevites 

19. 1968 

20. Bahamas 

21. Dr. Philip Dooher 

22. May 26, 1985 

23. Sandbox 

24. Coors Beer 

25. Greg Valentini 

26. The Beat 

27. The Onyx 

28. Mike Charnley, Keith Faulkner and Bill 
Magnusen 

29. 191 

30. SUAB 

31. "O'Connor Beach" 

32. Baby Fae 

33. There were two, Paul Fitzgerald and Bill 
LaCroix 

34. Frank Piso and Rich Russo 

35. A Flamingo 

36. Dr. Costillo 

37. Nitrous 

38. See Page 58 

39. 2 Years 

40. Bruce Springsteen 

41. PEOPLE 

42. Field Hockey and Tennis 



43. Rider or Riding 

44. President McCarthy 

45. Home Economics Club 

46. 224 

47. Senior Week 

48. The Boston Ballet Company 

49. Cans 

50. Insurance policy ran out 

51. 23 Years 

52. No alcohol 

53. Campus Police 

54. Change 

55. Shuttle Bus 

56. A Class Affair 

57. John Fields 

58. Ivan Slovan 

59. Jeff Chaulk's picture 

60. Edward Kennedy Jr. 

61. 18 

62. The Economics Dept. 

63. March 

64. "A Good Time" 

65. Seven 

66. The Bookstore 

67. Cindy Santomassimo 

68. Pufferbellies 

69. 13-16-1 

70. 2 

71. Henry Whittimore Library 

72. SUAB 

73. 16 

74. 85 

75. Too many! 

76. Ronald Wilson Reagan 

77. SAGA 

78. The College Center Game Room 

79. D. Justin McCarthy 

80. Our Sophomore Year 

81. No where, it went around Boston Harbor 

82. On the lawn 

83. the MAIAW Division 3 Tournament 

84. Herbie's Ice Cream 

85. The letters titling the building the D. Justin 
McCarthy (College Center) 



224